Brač

Brač


Brač is the third largest Adriatic island. It covers an area of 394.41 km. Island’s contours are asymmetrical; to the north they fall away gradually, to the south more steeply and this is reflected in the coastline. The northern side is indented and more accessible. The island mainly consists of limestone and its highest peak is Vidova gora (778 m). Brac is covered with evergreen trees, and 26.5% of its surface is woodland. Its climate is typically mediterranean and in terms of annual hours or sunlight (2 700) it is one of the sunniest areas in the Adriatic. There is no surface water at all on Brac, only a few fresh water springs in the area around bol. The total population in the 22 settlements is 13 900. The island is linked to the mainland by two ferry routes and the regular Split-Milna-Bol-Hvar line.

Archaeological finds of the first inhabitants of Brac date from extremely early periods: from the Neolithic and then the Bronze and Iron Ages. The many finds discovered in the Kopaéina caves near Supetar provide evidence of this. The first known inhabitants were Illyrians who gave the island its name, Brentos (stag), whilst the Greeks later called it Elaphusa. Although the Illyrians had very good trading links with the Greeks and their colonies in the immediate vicinity (lssa), they never allowed them to settle in their territory. In contrast to other parts of Dalmatia, during the period of Roman rule, which lasted in these parts for almost 500 years, not one walled settlement was built on Brac. The island, which appears in Roman documents as “capris laudata Brattia” (Pliny the Elder in Historia natumlis), served nearby Salona as a “suburb” and as supplier of agricultural products to Roman cities and legions on the mainland, principally olive oil, wine and livestock, and also its particularly high quality stone for building. The coastal, easier and more fertile areas of the island were settled by Roman citizens, whilst the old lllyrian inhabitants moved inland into the hilly areas of the island and thus preserved their national identity, right up until the Croats arrived in this area.

Brač
Brač stone

Zlatni rat (Golden  Cape) 2 km north of Bol  harbour, is a unique beach  not only in Bol, but in the  entire Adriatic. It is a narrow  white pebble spit stretching  out into the sea, 634 m long,  its tip veering according to  the tides. It is protected as a  geomiorphological  phenomenon.    Vidova gora is the highest peak on the Adriatic islands (778 m). It can be reached by a mountain path and the climb takes 2 hours.